International cooperation sector publishes its baseline report on anti-racism

International cooperation sector publishes its baseline report on anti-racism

July 8, 2021 – The international cooperation sector’s Anti-Racism Task Force for Accountability published its baseline report on anti-racism today. 

The report outlines key recommendations based on surveys completed by organizations that have signed onto the Anti-Racism Framework for Canada’s International Cooperation Sector, developed by an advisory group convened by Cooperation Canada. Through data collected from these surveys, the Task Force studied existing institutional commitments to anti-racism in administration and human resources; communications, advocacy and knowledge management; and program design, monitoring, evaluation and learning, and operations among 70 signatory organizations within the sector. 

Given a general lack of data on racial justice in our sector and beyond, this report is an important step in informing institutional and collective efforts in propelling anti-racism within the international cooperation sector. 

Findings include that organizations have “largely been reactive rather than proactive on issues related to racial inequality,” and that “there is a widespread lack of coherent, accountable and specifically antiracist efforts across signatory organizations.” Encouragingly, data collected indicate that 88% of signatory organizations have staff and/or volunteers who work and participate in equity, inclusion and anti-racist groups.

In addition to establishing benchmarks, the report outlines seven tangible recommendations on how organizations in the sector can make meaningful anti-racist shifts, starting with the development of a coherent organizational anti-racism strategy. 

Key findings and recommendations were shared on June 21, 2021, during the “Anti-Racism Report Launch: Where We Are, Where We’re Going” session at the Cooperation Forum. 

Moving forward, organizations will be able to sign onto the Framework on an ongoing basis and become signatories on March 21 of each year, having submitted the annual survey that will inform annual progress reports. The Task Force for Accountability is hosted by the Anti-Racism in Cooperation (ARC) Hub, the institutional and collective capacity of signatory organizations to make progress against the commitments outlined in the Framework.

This Framework is not perfect or final, nor is it the destination. It will, however, provide a common ground, guiding instruments, and a momentum for a more anti-racist international cooperation sector. You are invited to sign on to the Framework, reach out to others to do the same, and engage with us moving forward. This is just the beginning, and we can’t wait to begin this work with you.

Read the baseline report here. 

Cooperation Canada announces new and departing Board Members for its 2021-2022 fiscal year

Cooperation Canada announces new and departing Board Members for its 2021-2022 fiscal year

Cooperation Canada is delighted to announce the addition of five new Board Members. Elected on June 22, 2021 at the annual general meeting during the Cooperation Forum, we welcome the following members to the Board of Directors:

  • Nabil Ali (Director of Programs, International Development and Relief Foundation)
  • Christine Bui (Senior Director, International Programs, Oxfam-Quebec)
  • Leah Ettarh (Executive Director, Alberta Council for Global Cooperation)
  • Katharine Im-Jenkins (Chief Programs Officer, World University Service of Canada)
  • Dr. Dorothy Nyambi (President and CEO, Mennonite Economic Development Association)

We would also like to congratulate Eileen Alma, Nicole Hurtubise, and Tanjina Mirza on their re-election.

On behalf of its membership, Cooperation Canada thanks outgoing Board Members Zaid Al-Rawni, Michael Simpson, Rachel Vincent, Jessica Wood, and April Ingham (who served two years as Co-Chair and a total of six years on the Board) for contributing to and supporting our mandate.

“Cooperation Canada is incredibly lucky and honoured to welcome such talented people to the Board for this fiscal year,” said Nicolas Moyer, CEO of Cooperation Canada. “We look forward to their important contributions as we advance our work to support the sector’s bold sustainable development agenda.”

See the full Cooperation Canada Board of Directors here.

Canada makes history with an unprecedented global investment in the care economy and women’s rights

Canada makes history with an unprecedented global investment in the care economy and women’s rights

 

June 30, 2021  OTTAWA – Today Prime Minister Trudeau took bold action in support of a global feminist economic recovery by announcing $100 million in new international assistance funding dedicated to paid and unpaid care work at the Generation Equality Forum, the largest multi-sector gathering on women’s rights in the world. This is the first targeted global investment in the care economy by a donor government. 

This international assistance commitment, alongside Canada’s historic $30 billion commitment to build a national early learning and child care system in the 2021 federal budget, shows the government sees investment in the care economy – in areas such as childcare, eldercare and decent working conditions for domestic workers – as essential components to both Canada and the world’s pandemic economic recovery strategies. 

“In this critical time when the world is seeking to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic, Canada’s investment in care is timely as care work makes other work possible,” said Nicolas Moyer, CEO of Cooperation Canada. “The feminist recovery in Canada and everywhere in the world requires strong and effective leadership as demonstrated by Canada today.” 

COVID-19 exposed how important care is for our society and our economy, while also demonstrating just how fragile the care sector is. Heavy and unequal care responsibilities remain one of the most significant barriers to gender equality across the world. According to the International Labour Organization, even before the pandemic hit 42 per cent of women of working age said they were unable to do paid work because of their unpaid care responsibilities such as care-giving activities and domestic chores like cleaning and cooking – compared to just 6 per cent of men. 

Oxfam, along with global allies, have been calling for a multi-million-dollar investment in programs that will help recognize, reduce and redistribute unpaid care work, freeing up women’s time and creating more opportunities for work and political and community participation. Investing in both paid and unpaid care, in Canada and around the world, will support women’s rights and makes good economic sense. 

This $100 million commitment has the potential to support initiatives that advocate for the rights of care workers, create and improve care infrastructure and support programs which foster positive social norms around men and women’s shared responsibilities for care. 

 

Media Contact 
Kat Guerin
Communications Manager
[email protected]  

 

About Cooperation Canada 

Cooperation Canada brings together and advocates for Canada’s international development and humanitarian organizations by convening sector leaders, influencing policy and building capacity. Together, we work with partners both inside and outside Canada to build a world that’s fair, safe and sustainable for all. 

Canada’s climate financing doubled: Cooperation Canada looks forward to roll-out of G7 commitment

Canada’s climate financing doubled: Cooperation Canada looks forward to roll-out of G7 commitment

June 17, 2021 – Ottawa – During last weekend’s G7 Summit, Canada committed $5.3 billion over five years in new funding for international climate finance, doubling Canada’s earlier commitments. This is a welcome announcement that recognizes the urgent action needed to address the climate crisis and biodiversity loss that has disproportionately affected the poorest and most vulnerable across the globe. These much-needed funds will help vulnerable countries and their communities adapt to the climate crisis even as they continue the fight against COVID-19.  

 

This pandemic has reminded us that our world is more interconnected than ever. We will not stop COVID-19 unless we work together as a global community, and the health of our planet will continue to decline until all G7 leaders step up. By making its largest-ever multi-year climate pledge, the Government is giving real hope to vulnerable communities in low- and middle-income countries that are most affected by climate change. 

 

This commitment will go a long way to help small-scale farmers, the majority of whom are women, adapt to climate change and ensure stable food supplies – a vital step towards building community resiliency and defining the kind of recovery we want to see for our global community.   

 

“Among the important announcements Canada made during the G7 Summit, the doubling of international climate finance stands out for its importance and long-term impact in addressing the global climate crisis,” said Nicolas Moyer, CEO of Cooperation Canada. “This commitment is sure to play a significant role in the fight against the crisis. We applaud the Government in their decision to seriously address this important issue in the midst of many other concurrent priorities.” 

 

There is more hard work ahead, but ambitious planning and leadership will keep Canada on the right track to creating the world we want to recover to. Cooperation Canada looks forward to working closing with the Government on the implementation and delivery of this important commitment. 

 

 

Media Contact
Kat Guerin
Communications Manager
[email protected]

About Cooperation Canada
Cooperation Canada brings together and advocates for Canada’s international development and humanitarian organizations by convening sector leaders, influencing policy and building capacity. Together, we work with partners both inside and outside Canada to build a world that’s fair, safe and sustainable for all.

Letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Waiver

Letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Waiver

 

Cooperation Canada, alongside CanWaCH and social justice advocates across the country, urges Canada to do more in supporting mechanisms crucial to fight COVID19 and foster a fair global recovery. 

Read our letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about the TRIPS waiver, cosigned by Julia Anderson, CEO of CanWaCH, and our Chief Executive Officer, Nicolas Moyer.

It focuses on Canada’s support to India and South Africa’s proposal to waive the relevant obligations under the World Trade Organization’s Agreement on TRIPS, the COVID-19 Technology to Access Pool (CTAP) and the creation of a Canadian advisory group to explore solutions to the inequitable global response to COVID-19.